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Literacy publications and resources

Using ICT to Develop Literacy

This publication, produced in 2006 by the UNESCO ICT in Education Unit, with the support of Japanese Funds-in-Trust, provides a concise overview of the literacy issue and explains how ICT can be used to improve literacy education. The booklet discusses five areas in which ICT can be utilized in literacy education: enhancing learning; raising access to literacy education; training of teachers; localizing content; and creating a literacy-conducive environment. The booklet also provides examples of projects in which ICT has been utilized effectively to improve literacy education and concludes with recommendations for decision makers regarding the use of ICT in literacy education programmes.

New Functions of Higher Education and ICT to Achieve Education for All
In spite of the progress made towards achieving the objectives of the 1990 Jomtein Conference on 'Education for All', 125 million people are still out of school, and nearly 1 billion are illiterate. This paper looks at why these objectives have not been fully achieved and, subsequently, how they can be realised. This document, prepared for the Expert Roundtable on University and Technology-for-Literacy/Basic Education Partnership in Developing Countries (Paris, September 2001), includes examples of the use of ICT for the promotion of education for all in India and China.

Connections Between In-School and Out-of-School ICT Programs for Youth
After making the case that ICTs are essential learning tools, this paper looks into the challenge of raising the learning performance of disadvantaged youths with reference to several case studies. The paper goes on to make cross-country comparisons and discuss how to close the achievement and technology gaps. Finally, the author highlights the policy implications of what he has discussed.

Adult Learning and ICT: How to Respond to the Diversity of Needs?
Beginning with an analysis of patterns of unequal participation in adult learning, this paper goes on to examine some of the reasons for non-participation. This is followed by an analysis of differences in access to and use of ICT within adult learning. The paper then reviews ways in which public policy in OECD countries has tried to use ICT to increase access to and participation in adult learning, concluding with some policy pointers. The paper was prepared for November 2003's International Roundtable on ICT in Non-Formal and Adult Education: Supporting Out-of-School Youth and Adults.

ICT in Non-Formal Youth and Adult Education: Defining the Territory
In order to develop a better understanding of the key issues underlying the future effective application of ICTs to different forms of adult education, this paper contrasts the perceived benefits of ICT with these emerging limitations. From this basis it is possible to highlight a series of different areas for further discussion and action. The paper was prepared for November 2003's International Roundtable on ICT in Non-Formal and Adult Education: Supporting Out-of-School Youth and Adults.

New Technologies for Literacy and Adult Education: A Global Perspective
Prepared for November 2003's International Roundtable on ICT in Non-Formal and Adult Education: Supporting Out-of-School Youth and Adults, this paper presents a set of possible visions on the ways that technology can support the development of youth and adult literacy and non-formal education in a global perspective, with an emphasis on developing countries. The paper begins with a description of the status, trends and problems related to adult literacy and issues related to the application of technology to address these problems. New notions of literacy are explored. The paper concludes with implications and options for policy-makers in the use of expanded roles for new ICT in literacy development.

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