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Pe Arak inspires young Thais – an exclusive interview of the Thai actor and musician with UNESCO Bangkok

As part of the ‘Youth Empowerment through Mobile Learning’ project, UNESCO Bangkok is interviewing Thai celebrities and influential persons including singers, actors and actresses and business persons about their self-motivation, life goals and career planning, and on how they became successful. The first celebrity in this series is actor, musician, singer and model Arak Amornsupasiri or Pe about his motivating ideas and advice to inspire young people.

©Thai Army Club (http://www.facebook.com/pages/Nujang)

Q: What is your goal in life? And how do you plan to reach it? 

Pe: “I don’t really set any life goal but I do things I like and give a 100 per cent to it no matter what it is and how far I can reach. You have to see what your duty is, for example, if you are a student, your duty is to study. You don’t fail. If you wish to do music or sport, you have to manage your time well. People have plenty of time but some do not spend their time wisely. Some spend very long hours in Internet games café or hang out in an unpleasant place. They can claim that it’s a form of pleasure but it’s a wrong kind of pleasure. All people have the same amount of time and you should set your daily aim on what to do today and what you’ll have to do for tomorrow, and then do the best. I personally manage my time pretty badly. I work a lot all the time and I know my duty of being a ‘Dara’ (entertainer) and I do it the best possible. If you want to be successful in your career, do your best. When I take any job, I’ll make sure that there is no time conflict between jobs and I can make time for a rest.”

 “All people have the same amount of time and you should set your daily aim on what to do today and what you’ll have to do for tomorrow, and then do the best.” 

Q: When you have to work and study at the same time, how do you motivate yourself? And when you feel tired, feel down, or encounter a problem in life, how would you go about it? 

Pe: “As mentioned, you have to know your duty. You can do everything, but at a right proportion. Don’t overdo and don’t waste for something that has no sense. For those things like drinking, care racing, or games, you need to have a limit. I believe that everyone has the same amount of time but that the opportunities are not equal. You should see how education can bring you more opportunities. For me my parents are my motivation. I was a good student, but then I started to party and my school performance went down. I then did very badly at school and my parents were very upset. So I tried to pull myself back out and studied for a university entrance exam. I failed, but my English language score was good enough to get me to study at an international college. And I still do this today. Every time I feel discouraged or bored with life, I sleep to regain my energy. Every day we have so many things to think about that give us a headache. I believe in having a good rest and sleep; when you get up the next morning, it is a new day and everything will be better. Time can really help. Also I forget things easily. When I have a conflict with somebody, I forget it very shortly after.”    

“Every time I feel discouraged or bored with life, I sleep to regain my energy.”

Q: Could you give some food for thought or inspirational ideas to youth in non-formal and informal education programs that emphasize on lifelong learning and self-development?

Pe: “Education is crucial. People judge you by your education. They measure your level of being human by your education. If you drop your studies, you may not be able to come back again. Not necessarily students in a famous school are better than students in less famous schools, but this is how our society frames it. It’s really bad. If you want to fight and win, you’ll have to study. Education is the very first step and you have to climb a ladder one step at a time. If you want to jump, you can but it will be quite difficult.”    

 “Not necessarily students in a famous school are better than students in less famous schools, but this is how our society frames it. It’s really bad. If you want to fight and win, you’ll have to study” 

 
By Preeya Poopichayapongse and Rojana Manowalailao, UNESCO Bangkok

 

     


UNESCO Bangkok is implementing the ‘Youth Empowerment through Mobile Learning’ project in collaboration with the Office of the Non-Formal and Informal Education, Ministry of Education, Thailand to encourage youth, especially students in Non-Formal Education to build self-motivation and essential life skills, gain competencies, purpose in life and internal peace, and to introduce to them the concept of lifelong learning. 

UNESCO has been sending SMS messages in Thai language following last year’s workshop on Hopes and Needs of Youth in Thailand to over 100 Non-Formal Education students in Bangkok and Chiang Rai. A youth network has been created in Facebook. The fan page called ‘Youth Empowerment in Thailand’ and the Youth Empowerment Group were built as a platform for youth to find useful information, clips on life skills and inspirational quotes, welcoming all comments and exchange of ideas. The page is maintained in both Thai and English. There are now more than 1,500 Youth Empowerment fan pages that receive text messages daily. 

Facebook page: Youth Empowerment in Thailand 

For more information, please contact Ichiro Miyazawa (i.miyazawa[at]unesco.org) or Sowirin Chuanprapun (s.chuanprapun[at]unesco.org
  



08.09.2012