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Regulating Private Tutoring for Public Good

31.03.2014

Policy Options for Supplementary Education in Asia

(CERC Monograph Series in Comparative and International Education and Development No. 10)

In Asia, private supplementary tutoring consumes huge amounts of household finance, and has far-reaching implications for social inequalities, let alone the huge implications it has for school education services. Yet few governments have satisfactory regulations for the phenomenon. 

The book Regulating Private Tutoring for Public Good: Policy Options for Supplementary Education in Asia focuses on the extensive scale of private tutoring in countries of the region, regardless of their development status. The work shows wide diversity in the regulations introduced by governments in the Asian region. It notes not only that these governments can learn much from each other, but also that policy makers in other parts of the world can usefully look at patterns in Asia. The book also stresses the value of partnerships between governments, tutoring providers, schools, teachers’ unions, and other bodies.

The book is authored by Mark Bray, UNESCO Chair Professor in Comparative Education at the University of Hong Kong, and Ora Kwo, Associate Professor in the same University. Both have worked on this theme for over a decade, much of it in collaboration with UNESCO. UNESCO Bangkok and the Comparative Education Research Centre of the University of Hong Kong, the co-publishers, have officially launched the book on 31 March 2014 in Bangkok.

 

For more information, please contact Ramya Vivekanandan [r.vivekanandan(at)unesco.org] at the Education Policy and Reform Unit


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Regulating Private Tutoring for Public Good: Policy Options for Supplementary Education in Asia

(CERC Monograph Series in Comparative and International Education and Development No. 10)

Hong Kong, China: Comparative Education Research Centre, 2014, 103 p.

ISBN=9789881785299